I have a pretty extensive library of paper books.

Many of them are about programming. 30%, I’d say.

I used to buy a lot of books about software development. I’d take the train to the big city, go to the big library where I knew I could find the good books (when Linux was still sold in 4 CD sets). Books were basically the only way to learn programming on your own on a budget.

A good portion of my books are about self improvement, personal growth. I’m very passionate about the subject.

Some books about business. Small business, and books about solo operations, mostly. But I also have a fair share of the common startup-oriented books.

Some books are biographies or collections of stories about interesting people or companies.

Some books are about how to write.

Some are about marketing. I run a solo business and It’s essential for its existence to think a lot about marketing.

Near-zero fiction.

Most of my books are written in English. That’s how I learned English (I only started learning English at 14).

Some are books everyone talks about. Some others are obscure books I only got second-hand because they were out of print.

Some books live on my iPad or on my Kindle, but I really, really like to have a book in printed format.

I like to keep my books around. I want to look at them. I want them to look at me. I want to stay surrounded by them, to remind me I have a lot of things to learn and to explore, and there’s no time to fool around.

I haven’t read all my books. Yet today I ordered a bunch of books.

7 new books. Solo business, personal finance freedom, mental models, branding.

Not programming related this time, although I’m preparing a batch of programming books soon. Programming books expire so fast, and I think I already got the ones I’d consider pillars. But there’s always something I am missing.

One day I’ll start a “books” section here, perhaps, posting my notes on the books I like the most.


Coming soon:
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